Do I Really Need New Shoes?

Do I Really Need New Shoes?

We all have heard the recommendation to change shoes around 300-500 miles of use, but why? Where does this recommendation come from? When running, forces more than 2.5 times your body weight are applied up the leg and through the musculoskeletal system. Footwear has been designed to assist in absorbing these highmagnitude forces in order to improve performance and reduce injury risk. The cushioning in shoes can absorb shock and reduce how fast the force of landing acts on the body.

Hip Injuries- Nerves?

Hip Injuries- Nerves?

Hip injuries and pain are relatively common in runners; high hamstring strains, hip flexor strains, labral tears, piriformis syndrome, FAI... the list goes on. Most hip injuries are musculoskeletal (either bone/joint, ligament, or muscle), which can cause us to unintentionally neglect a particular group of hip injuries: nerve entrapments.

Cuboid Syndrome

Cuboid Syndrome

Are you having trouble recovering from an ankle sprain? Jennings and Davies (2005) produced a report that shows that one little bone in the foot might be responsible for your lasting issues. The cuboid bone sits between your heel bone and the beginning of your 5th toe on the outside of your foot.

Stand Up and Stretch

Stand Up and Stretch

The back and the hips have always had a complicated relationship, especially for runners in NYC. We sit all day, making our hamstrings stiff and angry. Because the hamstrings are so tight, when you run the pelvis rotates forward to help increase your hip extension, which makes your hip flexors tighter, which rotates your pelvis more...

RECOVERY AFTER A HIIT WORKOUT

RECOVERY AFTER A HIIT WORKOUT

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a widely-accepted as a measure for recovery after workouts. As runners are always looking to work harder (read: get faster) and avoid injury, research continues to expand. When considering how to improve performance, training sessions are almost always the first thought. HRV came into play once we started considering how well athletes were recovering after their workouts.

The Tired Foot?

The Tired Foot?

Stress fractures are, unfortunately, a relatively common running injury. These injuries are the result of an unbalanced scale of activity at your bone; essentially stress (training) is occurring too fast for the body to rebuild the bone at an adequate rate. There are a number of factors that can contribute to a stress fracture: anatomy, training error, recovery errors, running mechanics, poor nutrition... the list goes on.

Baby Got Back?

Baby Got Back?

Baby got back? While this song may remind you of the 90’s, for runners a weak booty may be contributing to some common running injuries. Your butt muscles, also known as the gluteus maximus, medium, and minimus, keep the pelvis steady, propel us forward, and extend the hips during walking and running. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing in yoga pants, a functionally strong gluteal group decreases the risk of injury when running.

The Back-Breaking Truth

The Back-Breaking Truth

“Low Back Pain” is the most commonly treated diagnosis in America, and certainly in NYC. LBP is an umbrella term than can include many different issues from joint derangement, nerve involvement, hip dysfunction, and muscular involvement. There are a few things that most people can do on their own to improve pain.

All Systems GO!

All Systems GO!

In February, it became official: I was running the TCS NYC Marathon! As a physical therapist working in a running-based clinic I figured I had a pretty good idea of what to expect from the training. The miles, time commitment, nutrition; I was ready for it all, right? I quickly found out that it was much more work than I expected.

Compartment Syndrome Update

Compartment Syndrome Update

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS)—can be a completely sidelining injury. It’s a condition most commonly seen in the lower leg among athletes, especially endurance runners. Symptoms typically develop as a tolerable pain, but as the runner continues running the pain worsens until it becomes unbearable and the runner has to stop.

WTF is the TFL?

WTF is the TFL?

If you've ever had a hip or knee injury as a runner, you most likely have heard of the TFL. But what exactly is it and what role does it play in daily movement? The TFL (tensor fascia latae) is a muscle responsible for flexing, abducting (bringing out to the side), and internally rotating your hip. The TFL originates at the top of your pelvis and narrows into an attachment to your iliotibial band. Tightness in this muscle pulls the ball of your hip too far forward in the socket and makes it difficult for your hip to maintain its neutral position when walking and running.

Marathons Make Me Sick!

Marathons Make Me Sick!

Congratulations! You ran the marathon! Once you’ve worn your medal to work and the celebrations have died down, it’s time to assess what went well, what didn’t, and how to make it better or the next training cycle.

As you’re recovering from the marathon, don’t neglect to rebuild your immune system. Take this time to get your body back to 100% before you get back out there. A recent study looked at the effects of marathon training on neutrophils and your immune system. Neutrophils areresponsible for attacking the surface of bacteria in the body.