Viewing entries in
IT band injuries

Don't Ignore the Niggle!

Don't Ignore the Niggle!

This is the time in our training cycles that little niggles and weird pains start cropping up. Maybe shin splints are setting in, or your left hamstring is deeeefinitely feeling different than your right.

The Knee and Hip Connection

The Knee and Hip Connection

When a new client comes in with a knee pain, eight out of ten times I’ll start my exam at the hip. Seven out of those eight times, my client looks at me like I’m crazy. I think it’s time I reveal the method to my madness.

IT Bands. They’re lame. But totally fixable.  {Guest Post!}

IT Bands. They’re lame. But totally fixable. {Guest Post!}

A little over two years ago I was running through the mountains of Virginia. Things were going well... until they weren’t. I would find out later from the esteemed, all-around amazing PT, Cat Fitzgerald, that years of running, cycling, and all manner of exercise (without the proper stretching or strength training) had finally caught up with me.

Higher Step Rate, Lower Injury Rate?

Higher Step Rate, Lower Injury Rate?

Approximately 50% of running-related injuries occur at the knee, many of which can be attributed to the inability of this joint to control the loads applied when the foot first hits the ground. Theoretically, if these loads on the knee can be reduced, injury rates can also be reduced. Step length is directly related to the amount of force transmitted through the ankle, knee, and hip. A long stride length puts the foot way out in front of the body, where it acts as a brake every time it hits the ground. 

All Systems GO!

All Systems GO!

In February, it became official: I was running the TCS NYC Marathon! As a physical therapist working in a running-based clinic I figured I had a pretty good idea of what to expect from the training. The miles, time commitment, nutrition; I was ready for it all, right? I quickly found out that it was much more work than I expected.

Compartment Syndrome Update

Compartment Syndrome Update

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS)—can be a completely sidelining injury. It’s a condition most commonly seen in the lower leg among athletes, especially endurance runners. Symptoms typically develop as a tolerable pain, but as the runner continues running the pain worsens until it becomes unbearable and the runner has to stop.

WTF is the TFL?

WTF is the TFL?

If you've ever had a hip or knee injury as a runner, you most likely have heard of the TFL. But what exactly is it and what role does it play in daily movement? The TFL (tensor fascia latae) is a muscle responsible for flexing, abducting (bringing out to the side), and internally rotating your hip. The TFL originates at the top of your pelvis and narrows into an attachment to your iliotibial band. Tightness in this muscle pulls the ball of your hip too far forward in the socket and makes it difficult for your hip to maintain its neutral position when walking and running.