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Posts in NYC marathon
Why You Should Strength Train in the Off-Season

As fall race season comes to a close and 2019 is on the horizon, it’s time to think about the off-season planning.  As you begin to lay out your 2019 race calendar, take note of when your next training plan starts and the downtime you may have from the last race. Like many runners, the second one race ends, we’re thinking about the next one. But what about strength training? Where does that fit in to your 2019 plan?

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Tips from the Marathon Discovery Event!

Tips from the Marathon Discovery Event!

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Calf Cramp Season!

Welcome to the last two weeks of August, also known as “Calf Cramp Season” at Custom Performance. Like clockwork, we are treated to a deluge of marathoners complaining of calf cramping and pain. Sound familiar?

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Don't Ignore the Niggle!

This is the time in our training cycles that little niggles and weird pains start cropping up. Maybe shin splints are setting in, or your left hamstring is deeeefinitely feeling different than your right.

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Heart Rate Variability

If you’ve been paying attention to the fitness world lately, you’ve probably heard the term heart rate variability thrown around in regards to training and recovery. In the simplest terms, heart rate variability (HRV) is the measure of time intervals between heartbeats, measuring how well our autonomic nervous system is functioning.

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Glute Strength for Injury Prevention

Wondering what all the glute hype is about? Why does Physical Therapy nearly always involve hip strengthening, especially targeting the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles?

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The Power of the Mantra

Right before the 2017 NYC marathon, Meb Keflezighi came to Custom Performance to kick off the weekend with a Q&A session. When talking about training and racing he said "I really believe that during preparation it’s 90% physical, 10% mental. When the gun goes off it’s 90% mental and 10% being healthy.” As racing season ramps up, let’s not forget that mental training is just as important as physical training.

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Brain vs. Food

Fueling for exercise, especially during long runs, is a commonly discussed topic in the running world. Pre-race carb-loading, mid-race fuel sources, and post-race meals are all part of a typical routine. So why do we sometimes not feel hungry when finishing a run? And why are we starving other times? It turns out that following aerobic exercise our brain’s response to food can sometimes be reduced.

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Higher Step Rate, Lower Injury Rate?

Approximately 50% of running-related injuries occur at the knee, many of which can be attributed to the inability of this joint to control the loads applied when the foot first hits the ground. Theoretically, if these loads on the knee can be reduced, injury rates can also be reduced. Step length is directly related to the amount of force transmitted through the ankle, knee, and hip. A long stride length puts the foot way out in front of the body, where it acts as a brake every time it hits the ground. 

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Plyos for Performance

To be at peak performance and minimal injury risk, strength training should be an integral part of all running programs. For your strength training to be effective, you should should be specific and deliberate when choosing your exercises.

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Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

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Hip Injuries- Nerves?

Hip injuries and pain are relatively common in runners; high hamstring strains, hip flexor strains, labral tears, piriformis syndrome, FAI... the list goes on. Most hip injuries are musculoskeletal (either bone/joint, ligament, or muscle), which can cause us to unintentionally neglect a particular group of hip injuries: nerve entrapments.

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