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gait analysis

All Systems Go!

All Systems Go!

Running a marathon is not just about your muscles and your legs. As I reflected back on the process it dawned on me that it took every system on my body to complete the Marathon. So here it is, a review of all the systems it took to get to the finish line!

Risk Factors for the Evasive Fibular Stress Fracture

Risk Factors for the Evasive Fibular Stress Fracture

Awareness of stress fractures and their season-ending effects has become very prevalent in the running community. Runners are getting a sense of what to look for if they are worried about a possible stress fracture. This is helpful to a degree, but recently we've been seeing an increase in less-common stress fracture types. One in particular, fibular stress fractures (the other lower leg bone next to the tibia), has been showing up in at Custom Performance more frequently.

Why I broke up with my "Fitness Friend"

Why I broke up with my "Fitness Friend"

I used to have this friend. Well, it was an app friend. Maybe I should call it a buddy or pal. I was letting myself fall out of shape and decided I needed a change. I needed to work on my fitness. I had heard about this app that would be my best friend, but it turned into a complicated break-up.

Injuries Suck - But They Don’t Have To!

Injuries Suck - But They Don’t Have To!

Being injured sucks, there's no way around that. Injuries always seem to occur at the most inopportune times and throw a wrench in your perfectly designed training schedule. Every injury, no matter how big or small, sends a runner through the 5 stages of grief.

Glute Strength for Injury Prevention

Glute Strength for Injury Prevention

Wondering what all the glute hype is about? Why does Physical Therapy nearly always involve hip strengthening, especially targeting the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles?

Heat vs. Ice

Heat vs. Ice

As PTs, we are often asked when to use ice versus heat for injuries. The answer definitely depends on the injury. Ice and heat can both be used to reduce pain, but they are best applied in different situations. A recent literature review conducted by Malanga, Yan, and Stark examined the differences between heat and ice applications and their effectiveness.

Does Racing Age Matter?

Does Racing Age Matter?

Endurance races, such as ultra-marathons and Ironman triathlons are becoming increasingly popular around the world. Whether it’s the idea of a new mental or physical challenge or just plain love of the sport, participation in these events continues to increase. In the Ironman triathlon, the overall number of finishers - both male and female - has increased dramatically over the past 30 years. In addition to increased participation, improvements in performance in this event have also been reported. But is there an ideal age for best performance?

Feel the (Foot) Burn

Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

IS MOBILITY BAD OR GOOD?

IS MOBILITY BAD OR GOOD?

Hypermobility vs Flexibility? Is Mobility a Bad Thing?

What is hypermobility?

When talking about fitness, many people use flexibility and mobility interchangeably, but the two concepts are actually very different! Mobility refers to the range of motion in a joint. Mobility is influenced by both the joint structures (where one bone meets another) and the soft tissue that surrounds that joint. Flexibility refers only to the soft tissue itself.

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.