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nutrition for runners

All Systems Go!

All Systems Go!

Running a marathon is not just about your muscles and your legs. As I reflected back on the process it dawned on me that it took every system on my body to complete the Marathon. So here it is, a review of all the systems it took to get to the finish line!

"Run The World" Takeaways

"Run The World" Takeaways

Sometimes I want to read about running, but not about how I should be running, or what I should change about my running. If you’re feeling the same, “Run the World” is for you!

Run, Eat, Work, Sleep, Repeat

Run, Eat, Work, Sleep, Repeat

If this schedule sounds familiar, you’re most likely training for an upcoming race. Whether it’s a 10K or full marathon, your running schedule is probably dictating your life. Some weeks go smoothly and others can be a challenge. Between work, your social life, training, and getting enough food and sleep, how do we find the balance? Everyone maintains their life balance in different ways. If you’re anything like me, you rely on lists, meal prep, and a training schedule to guide you through each week. And while every week definitely hasn’t been perfect (I’m always learning), here’s how I’ve been balancing it all out.

Risk Factors for the Evasive Fibular Stress Fracture

Risk Factors for the Evasive Fibular Stress Fracture

Awareness of stress fractures and their season-ending effects has become very prevalent in the running community. Runners are getting a sense of what to look for if they are worried about a possible stress fracture. This is helpful to a degree, but recently we've been seeing an increase in less-common stress fracture types. One in particular, fibular stress fractures (the other lower leg bone next to the tibia), has been showing up in at Custom Performance more frequently.

Calf Cramp Season!

Calf Cramp Season!

Welcome to the last two weeks of August, also known as “Calf Cramp Season” at Custom Performance. Like clockwork, we are treated to a deluge of marathoners complaining of calf cramping and pain. Sound familiar?

Heat vs. Ice

Heat vs. Ice

As PTs, we are often asked when to use ice versus heat for injuries. The answer definitely depends on the injury. Ice and heat can both be used to reduce pain, but they are best applied in different situations. A recent literature review conducted by Malanga, Yan, and Stark examined the differences between heat and ice applications and their effectiveness.

IT Bands. They’re lame. But totally fixable.  {Guest Post!}

IT Bands. They’re lame. But totally fixable. {Guest Post!}

A little over two years ago I was running through the mountains of Virginia. Things were going well... until they weren’t. I would find out later from the esteemed, all-around amazing PT, Cat Fitzgerald, that years of running, cycling, and all manner of exercise (without the proper stretching or strength training) had finally caught up with me.

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

All Systems GO!

All Systems GO!

In February, it became official: I was running the TCS NYC Marathon! As a physical therapist working in a running-based clinic I figured I had a pretty good idea of what to expect from the training. The miles, time commitment, nutrition; I was ready for it all, right? I quickly found out that it was much more work than I expected.

Compartment Syndrome Update

Compartment Syndrome Update

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS)—can be a completely sidelining injury. It’s a condition most commonly seen in the lower leg among athletes, especially endurance runners. Symptoms typically develop as a tolerable pain, but as the runner continues running the pain worsens until it becomes unbearable and the runner has to stop.

WTF is the TFL?

WTF is the TFL?

If you've ever had a hip or knee injury as a runner, you most likely have heard of the TFL. But what exactly is it and what role does it play in daily movement? The TFL (tensor fascia latae) is a muscle responsible for flexing, abducting (bringing out to the side), and internally rotating your hip. The TFL originates at the top of your pelvis and narrows into an attachment to your iliotibial band. Tightness in this muscle pulls the ball of your hip too far forward in the socket and makes it difficult for your hip to maintain its neutral position when walking and running.