Viewing entries in
running teams nyc

The Knee and Hip Connection

The Knee and Hip Connection

When a new client comes in with a knee pain, eight out of ten times I’ll start my exam at the hip. Seven out of those eight times, my client looks at me like I’m crazy. I think it’s time I reveal the method to my madness.

The Power of the Mantra

The Power of the Mantra

Right before the 2017 NYC marathon, Meb Keflezighi came to Custom Performance to kick off the weekend with a Q&A session. When talking about training and racing he said "I really believe that during preparation it’s 90% physical, 10% mental. When the gun goes off it’s 90% mental and 10% being healthy.” As racing season ramps up, let’s not forget that mental training is just as important as physical training.

Brain vs. Food

Brain vs. Food

Fueling for exercise, especially during long runs, is a commonly discussed topic in the running world. Pre-race carb-loading, mid-race fuel sources, and post-race meals are all part of a typical routine. So why do we sometimes not feel hungry when finishing a run? And why are we starving other times? It turns out that following aerobic exercise our brain’s response to food can sometimes be reduced.

Feel the (Foot) Burn

Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

Higher Step Rate, Lower Injury Rate?

Higher Step Rate, Lower Injury Rate?

Approximately 50% of running-related injuries occur at the knee, many of which can be attributed to the inability of this joint to control the loads applied when the foot first hits the ground. Theoretically, if these loads on the knee can be reduced, injury rates can also be reduced. Step length is directly related to the amount of force transmitted through the ankle, knee, and hip. A long stride length puts the foot way out in front of the body, where it acts as a brake every time it hits the ground. 

Don't Skip Leg Day!

Don't Skip Leg Day!

If you asked most runners what day they would skip in their training plan, I can guarantee most of them will answer “strength.” We often see runners whose training plans don't even have a strength day included! While running is extremely demanding on our legs, it involves primarily linear movement, or movement in a forward direction only. Runners typically have weaker glutes, hips, and hamstrings compared to the quads, which can result in numerous lower body injuries

Plyos for Performance

Plyos for Performance

To be at peak performance and minimal injury risk, strength training should be an integral part of all running programs. For your strength training to be effective, you should should be specific and deliberate when choosing your exercises.

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

Do I Really Need New Shoes?

Do I Really Need New Shoes?

We all have heard the recommendation to change shoes around 300-500 miles of use, but why? Where does this recommendation come from? When running, forces more than 2.5 times your body weight are applied up the leg and through the musculoskeletal system. Footwear has been designed to assist in absorbing these highmagnitude forces in order to improve performance and reduce injury risk. The cushioning in shoes can absorb shock and reduce how fast the force of landing acts on the body.

Cuboid Syndrome

Cuboid Syndrome

Are you having trouble recovering from an ankle sprain? Jennings and Davies (2005) produced a report that shows that one little bone in the foot might be responsible for your lasting issues. The cuboid bone sits between your heel bone and the beginning of your 5th toe on the outside of your foot.

RECOVERY AFTER A HIIT WORKOUT

RECOVERY AFTER A HIIT WORKOUT

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a widely-accepted as a measure for recovery after workouts. As runners are always looking to work harder (read: get faster) and avoid injury, research continues to expand. When considering how to improve performance, training sessions are almost always the first thought. HRV came into play once we started considering how well athletes were recovering after their workouts.

Baby Got Back?

Baby Got Back?

Baby got back? While this song may remind you of the 90’s, for runners a weak booty may be contributing to some common running injuries. Your butt muscles, also known as the gluteus maximus, medium, and minimus, keep the pelvis steady, propel us forward, and extend the hips during walking and running. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing in yoga pants, a functionally strong gluteal group decreases the risk of injury when running.