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stretching

The Knee and Hip Connection

The Knee and Hip Connection

When a new client comes in with a knee pain, eight out of ten times I’ll start my exam at the hip. Seven out of those eight times, my client looks at me like I’m crazy. I think it’s time I reveal the method to my madness.

Brain vs. Food

Brain vs. Food

Fueling for exercise, especially during long runs, is a commonly discussed topic in the running world. Pre-race carb-loading, mid-race fuel sources, and post-race meals are all part of a typical routine. So why do we sometimes not feel hungry when finishing a run? And why are we starving other times? It turns out that following aerobic exercise our brain’s response to food can sometimes be reduced.

Plyos for Performance

Plyos for Performance

To be at peak performance and minimal injury risk, strength training should be an integral part of all running programs. For your strength training to be effective, you should should be specific and deliberate when choosing your exercises.

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

Do I Really Need New Shoes?

Do I Really Need New Shoes?

We all have heard the recommendation to change shoes around 300-500 miles of use, but why? Where does this recommendation come from? When running, forces more than 2.5 times your body weight are applied up the leg and through the musculoskeletal system. Footwear has been designed to assist in absorbing these highmagnitude forces in order to improve performance and reduce injury risk. The cushioning in shoes can absorb shock and reduce how fast the force of landing acts on the body.

Hip Injuries- Nerves?

Hip Injuries- Nerves?

Hip injuries and pain are relatively common in runners; high hamstring strains, hip flexor strains, labral tears, piriformis syndrome, FAI... the list goes on. Most hip injuries are musculoskeletal (either bone/joint, ligament, or muscle), which can cause us to unintentionally neglect a particular group of hip injuries: nerve entrapments.

Cuboid Syndrome

Cuboid Syndrome

Are you having trouble recovering from an ankle sprain? Jennings and Davies (2005) produced a report that shows that one little bone in the foot might be responsible for your lasting issues. The cuboid bone sits between your heel bone and the beginning of your 5th toe on the outside of your foot.

Stand Up and Stretch

Stand Up and Stretch

The back and the hips have always had a complicated relationship, especially for runners in NYC. We sit all day, making our hamstrings stiff and angry. Because the hamstrings are so tight, when you run the pelvis rotates forward to help increase your hip extension, which makes your hip flexors tighter, which rotates your pelvis more...