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Posts tagged best PT
Emotional Hurdles

By Dr. Cathlin Fitzgerald, PT, DPT, CSCS


Runners who have experienced injury know that there can be many mental and emotional hurdles to overcome throughout the recovery process. It can challenge your identity as a runner or athlete, you can feel isolated from your community, you can experience the sadness of not being able to do what brings you joy… and those are just off the top of my head!


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Strength Training for Bones!

Weight training affects more than just muscles; it can also strengthen your bones! As we age, bones begin to lose mineral density (Bone Mineral Density - BMD), and they becoming slightly weaker as a result; this is particularly evident in postmenopausal women. This condition is commonly known as osteoporosis. This decrease in BMD can be of concern, as weaker bones are at an increased risk of bone fracture. Longitudinal studies have shown that appropriatelyprescribed progressive resistance training can stimulate bone growth and increasing BMD in older adults, reducing risk of fracture.

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Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

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Hip Injuries- Nerves?

Hip injuries and pain are relatively common in runners; high hamstring strains, hip flexor strains, labral tears, piriformis syndrome, FAI... the list goes on. Most hip injuries are musculoskeletal (either bone/joint, ligament, or muscle), which can cause us to unintentionally neglect a particular group of hip injuries: nerve entrapments.

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Cuboid Syndrome

Are you having trouble recovering from an ankle sprain? Jennings and Davies (2005) produced a report that shows that one little bone in the foot might be responsible for your lasting issues. The cuboid bone sits between your heel bone and the beginning of your 5th toe on the outside of your foot.

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RECOVERY AFTER A HIIT WORKOUT

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a widely-accepted as a measure for recovery after workouts. As runners are always looking to work harder (read: get faster) and avoid injury, research continues to expand. When considering how to improve performance, training sessions are almost always the first thought. HRV came into play once we started considering how well athletes were recovering after their workouts.

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The Tired Foot?

Stress fractures are, unfortunately, a relatively common running injury. These injuries are the result of an unbalanced scale of activity at your bone; essentially stress (training) is occurring too fast for the body to rebuild the bone at an adequate rate. There are a number of factors that can contribute to a stress fracture: anatomy, training error, recovery errors, running mechanics, poor nutrition... the list goes on.

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Baby Got Back?

Baby got back? While this song may remind you of the 90’s, for runners a weak booty may be contributing to some common running injuries. Your butt muscles, also known as the gluteus maximus, medium, and minimus, keep the pelvis steady, propel us forward, and extend the hips during walking and running. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing in yoga pants, a functionally strong gluteal group decreases the risk of injury when running.

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Compartment Syndrome Update

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS)—can be a completely sidelining injury. It’s a condition most commonly seen in the lower leg among athletes, especially endurance runners. Symptoms typically develop as a tolerable pain, but as the runner continues running the pain worsens until it becomes unbearable and the runner has to stop.

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Marathons Make Me Sick!

Congratulations! You ran the marathon! Once you’ve worn your medal to work and the celebrations have died down, it’s time to assess what went well, what didn’t, and how to make it better or the next training cycle.

As you’re recovering from the marathon, don’t neglect to rebuild your immune system. Take this time to get your body back to 100% before you get back out there. A recent study looked at the effects of marathon training on neutrophils and your immune system. Neutrophils areresponsible for attacking the surface of bacteria in the body.

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Why Fresh Legs!??!?!

On November 1, 2015, several sweaty, joyful, exhausted runners trickled through our doors after crossing the finish line of the TCS NYC Marathon. Sore and victorious, they told their heroic tales of their mornings that had begun before sunrise on Staten Island and involved self-transformation through the boroughs of New York City, all the way to the finish in Central Park. 

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Age and Achilles

Most runners are acutely aware of all of the different types of injuries that can occur. I f they aren't , it's typically because they've been lucky enough to remain injury - free. But as we age, t he possibility of injury continues to increase.

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