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Posts tagged injury prevention
Emotional Hurdles

By Dr. Cathlin Fitzgerald, PT, DPT, CSCS


Runners who have experienced injury know that there can be many mental and emotional hurdles to overcome throughout the recovery process. It can challenge your identity as a runner or athlete, you can feel isolated from your community, you can experience the sadness of not being able to do what brings you joy… and those are just off the top of my head!


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Injuries Suck - But They Don’t Have To!

Being injured sucks, there's no way around that. Injuries always seem to occur at the most inopportune times and throw a wrench in your perfectly designed training schedule. Every injury, no matter how big or small, sends a runner through the 5 stages of grief.

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Activating the Glutes

You’ve just finished mile 26, the finish line is in sight, and you decide it’s time to start that finishing kick. Suddenly, you feel a sharp pain, immediately grab the back of your thigh, and stop running. Chances are, you’ve most likely pulled a hamstring. How? And what and can you do to avoid injuries like this in the future? It comes down to how your hamstrings and glutes work together.

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Higher Step Rate, Lower Injury Rate?

Approximately 50% of running-related injuries occur at the knee, many of which can be attributed to the inability of this joint to control the loads applied when the foot first hits the ground. Theoretically, if these loads on the knee can be reduced, injury rates can also be reduced. Step length is directly related to the amount of force transmitted through the ankle, knee, and hip. A long stride length puts the foot way out in front of the body, where it acts as a brake every time it hits the ground. 

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The Tired Foot?

Stress fractures are, unfortunately, a relatively common running injury. These injuries are the result of an unbalanced scale of activity at your bone; essentially stress (training) is occurring too fast for the body to rebuild the bone at an adequate rate. There are a number of factors that can contribute to a stress fracture: anatomy, training error, recovery errors, running mechanics, poor nutrition... the list goes on.

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