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Posts tagged physical therapy for runners
Why You Should Strengthen In The Off-Season

Why You Should Strengthen In The Off-Season

by Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt

As fall race season comes to a close and 2019 is on the horizon, it’s time to think about the off-season planning.  As you begin to lay out your 2019 race calendar, take note of when your next training plan starts and the downtime you may have from the last race. Like many runners, the second one race ends, we’re thinking about the next one. But what about strength training? Where does that fit in to your 2019 plan?


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How Fast Is Too Fast?


How fast is too fast?

By Greg Laraia

One of the biggest questions I get during training cycles is: “how fast should I be going on my runs?” Most people are surprised by the answer I give them, because it’s usually, “slower than you are currently.” One of the key pieces of a training plan is consistency, not only with running but with your paces. Make easy days easy and hard days hard.


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Goal Setting

As another year of racing ends, the new year is a great time to look back, reflect, and set new goals or intentions for your running. For some of us, these goals may be more general; to run more consistently or work on strength. Others may be more specific; to run a PR, break 2 hours in the half, or quality for Boston. Regardless of what your goal may be, setting one (or a few) is vital to improving overall running performance.



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Naps for Performance?

Recovery continues to become a larger focus on the road to improved performance. So far, research has focused primarily on different systems including cardiovascular and muscular recovery, but a recent article from the European Journal of Sports Science looked at the effects of recovery more broadly; does an afternoon nap improve performance?

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Heart Rate Variability

If you’ve been paying attention to the fitness world lately, you’ve probably heard the term heart rate variability thrown around in regards to training and recovery. In the simplest terms, heart rate variability (HRV) is the measure of time intervals between heartbeats, measuring how well our autonomic nervous system is functioning.

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Injuries Suck - But They Don’t Have To!

Being injured sucks, there's no way around that. Injuries always seem to occur at the most inopportune times and throw a wrench in your perfectly designed training schedule. Every injury, no matter how big or small, sends a runner through the 5 stages of grief.

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Does Racing Age Matter?

Endurance races, such as ultra-marathons and Ironman triathlons are becoming increasingly popular around the world. Whether it’s the idea of a new mental or physical challenge or just plain love of the sport, participation in these events continues to increase. In the Ironman triathlon, the overall number of finishers - both male and female - has increased dramatically over the past 30 years. In addition to increased participation, improvements in performance in this event have also been reported. But is there an ideal age for best performance?

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Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

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Plyos for Performance

To be at peak performance and minimal injury risk, strength training should be an integral part of all running programs. For your strength training to be effective, you should should be specific and deliberate when choosing your exercises.

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Do I Really Need New Shoes?

We all have heard the recommendation to change shoes around 300-500 miles of use, but why? Where does this recommendation come from? When running, forces more than 2.5 times your body weight are applied up the leg and through the musculoskeletal system. Footwear has been designed to assist in absorbing these highmagnitude forces in order to improve performance and reduce injury risk. The cushioning in shoes can absorb shock and reduce how fast the force of landing acts on the body.

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Compartment Syndrome Update

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS)—can be a completely sidelining injury. It’s a condition most commonly seen in the lower leg among athletes, especially endurance runners. Symptoms typically develop as a tolerable pain, but as the runner continues running the pain worsens until it becomes unbearable and the runner has to stop.

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Post-marathon Blues??

Post Marathon Blues? Completely Normal! Let us help you work through it.

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