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Posts tagged running coaches
When Running Isn't Fun

By Greg Laraia, ATC


Are you having fun when you run? If you are becoming stressed out and unhappy due to your training cycle, take a step back and re-evaluate the goals you’re chasing. For many runners, training is a way of life, but it can slip into feeling like work. If running is not paying your bills, then it should be an enjoyable thing. 



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Does choosing your own effort make workouts more enjoyable?

By Dr. Cathlin Fitzgerald, PT, DPT, CSCS 

HIIT (High intensity interval training) has gained popularity in recent years as an efficient and fun workout. While HIIT draws to mind burpees, jumping jacks, and push ups, interval speedwork is also a HIIT workout. Endurance athletes have been doing HIIT workouts for ages; we just call it speedwork.

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A Brief History of Women's Running

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS

"There exists no conclusive scientific or medical evidence that long-distance running is contraindicated for the healthy, trained female athlete. The ACSM recommends that females be allowed to compete at the national and international level in the same distances in which their male counterparts compete.” 1980 ACSM Position Statement on women’s distance running.

Thanks, ACSM! Marathons were a part of the first international Olympics in 1896, but it would be almost 100 years before women were allowed to compete. Before 1984, there was no women’s marathon category in the Olympics. 1982 was the first track and field NCAA Championships for women. Since the 1980’s,  it’s astounding how far women’s distance running has come. Joan Benoit Samuelson, for example, won the Olympic marathon in 1984 and still races today at the age of 62. She also won the 1979 Boston Marathon with a 2:35:15, and set the women’s record at Boston with a 2:22:43 in 1983. We are still in the first generation of women’s distance runners, which seems almost surreal!


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Running With Music

By Lisbeth Hoyt, DPT

Do you run with music? We think of running with music as just a personal preference, but what if there were certain conditions in which running with music could improve your running to exhaustion time or to help you forget about the environment you’re running in?

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All or Nothing

By Kathleen Leninger, DPT 

I am amazing at high-level training and at being a couch potato, but I basically fail at everything in between. At the height of my running career I had 2 training cycles that consisted of 6 days of activity, 3 brick workouts (triathlon training), and 2 strength days, and I didn’t miss one day.  I swam in hotel pools and woke up at the crack of dawn on vacation, doing everything possible to get the workouts in. My training plan was my bible. My current training plan looks way different. I am training to run lower miles 3 days a week with 2 days of easy core. I have only hit that once in the last 4 weeks! Perhaps it’s my all or nothing personality, but I’m struggling to stay on track. I don’t think I’m alone here. 


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Timing Your Iron

By Dr. Cathlin Fitzgerald, PT, DPT, CSCS


Iron deficiency is a common problem, is even more common among endurance athletes. Iron is lost through sweat, urine, the GI tract, and menstruation. Athletes need more iron than the average person; the more efficient the athlete, the more sweat is produced, and so more iron is lost. It has been shown that high intensity and endurance exercise can increase iron losses by 70%. Add in a vegan or vegetarian diet and the risk increases even more because the iron in plants is less absorbable.


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Running While Sick

By Kathleen Leninger, DPT

When you’re training, experiencing sudden post-nasal drip, fever, headache, or any other initial signs of illness can really throw a wrench in your plans. You have a hard decision to make; to run or not to run?  

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The Upside Down of Running

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS


We all love running; running is awesome! However, we would be only telling half the story if we only talked about its benefits. Running has some skeletons in the closet. Running has a dark side. 


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Stubborn Tendon Pain? Try this!

By Dr. Cathlin Fitzgerald, PT, DPT, CSC

Tendon injuries can be incredibly frustrating. While you can have a lot of improvements quickly - a decrease in the amount of pain (less intense or severe), improved flexibility and strength, and better running - the pain can linger for quite awhile.



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What The Heck Is Pain?

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS

Pain is so individual. It’s felt and processed differently by everyone. But what causes pain in the short and in the long term? Why does pain become chronic?


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Amenorrheic Running

Kathleen Leninger, DPT

Back in the day, I was a fast runner. I have a distinct memory of going to Penn Relays as a junior, so excited to run the 4x400 (I was the anchor) and that morning I woke up with my period.  At that point in my life I got my period every few months but most of my teammates hadn’t had their period in over a year! I wanted that. It was such a badge of honor and I was so embarrassed to be the only fast girl who got her period in season. Years later I learned that is called amenorrhea and that nothing about it is cool. 

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What Actually Makes You Stronger

By Kathleen Leninger, DPT

Everyone knows that  “core and glutes” are the secret to making a runner stronger, right?  We go to yoga, spin, HIIT classes, and Bread and Butter to make us strong. The real answer is much more complicated.  Strength classes are important, but it is just practicing muscle memory. So what actually allows your body to keep functioning and to stay strong?  There are 3 main functions we need the body to have to run (and to live):


1 – Bones to stay upright and move around

2 – Muscle to move the bones and get from A to B

3 – Signals to determine what to move and where to move

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