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Posts tagged running coaching nyc
What The Heck Is Pain?

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS

Pain is so individual. It’s felt and processed differently by everyone. But what causes pain in the short and in the long term? Why does pain become chronic?


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Book Review: Good to Go by Christie Aschwanden

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS


If running research and narrative journalism had a baby, it would be this book. In Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn From the Strange Science of Recovery,  Christie Aschwanden challenges the running community’s most popular beliefs one topic at a time. Aschwanden debates a variety of topics, including overtraining syndrome, beer to increase running performance, fuel options, doping, meditation, dietary supplements, medications, cryotherapy, and sleep as a recovery method…

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Extra Cusion = MORE Impact?

As the trend in running shoes moves away from minimalism, many shoe companies have claimed that extra cushioning will reduce impact forces on the body, especially with downhill running. Intuitively, would seem to be true.


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Anatomy of a Runner

By Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt


When most people think about running, the first body part attributed to the movement are our legs. While our legs do the majority of the work, running is actually a full body exercise. Our legs move us forward, our trunk stabilizes our body, and our arms assist our legs with forward propulsion.


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Race Recovery

Recommendations for rest and recovery after a marathon vary widely across professionals and depend greatly on the individual marathoner. Then you can break it down even further; when is the cardiovascular system recovered? Muscles? Hormones? The list goes on and on!


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Hormone, Fat and Bone: The Saga Continues

If you’ve read my blogs in the past, you know my main goal in life is to educate the world on the importance of hormones and bone health. The rest of the world is finally catching up with me and new research is coming out about the importance of bone marrow fat cells and their relationship with bone and hormones.


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Why You Should Strengthen In The Off-Season

Why You Should Strengthen In The Off-Season

by Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt

As fall race season comes to a close and 2019 is on the horizon, it’s time to think about the off-season planning.  As you begin to lay out your 2019 race calendar, take note of when your next training plan starts and the downtime you may have from the last race. Like many runners, the second one race ends, we’re thinking about the next one. But what about strength training? Where does that fit in to your 2019 plan?


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Why I broke up with my "Fitness Friend"

I used to have this friend. Well, it was an app friend. Maybe I should call it a buddy or pal. I was letting myself fall out of shape and decided I needed a change. I needed to work on my fitness. I had heard about this app that would be my best friend, but it turned into a complicated break-up.

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The Knee and Hip Connection

When a new client comes in with a knee pain, eight out of ten times I’ll start my exam at the hip. Seven out of those eight times, my client looks at me like I’m crazy. I think it’s time I reveal the method to my madness.

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Brain vs. Food

Fueling for exercise, especially during long runs, is a commonly discussed topic in the running world. Pre-race carb-loading, mid-race fuel sources, and post-race meals are all part of a typical routine. So why do we sometimes not feel hungry when finishing a run? And why are we starving other times? It turns out that following aerobic exercise our brain’s response to food can sometimes be reduced.

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Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

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Higher Step Rate, Lower Injury Rate?

Approximately 50% of running-related injuries occur at the knee, many of which can be attributed to the inability of this joint to control the loads applied when the foot first hits the ground. Theoretically, if these loads on the knee can be reduced, injury rates can also be reduced. Step length is directly related to the amount of force transmitted through the ankle, knee, and hip. A long stride length puts the foot way out in front of the body, where it acts as a brake every time it hits the ground. 

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