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Posts tagged running exercises
What The Heck Is Pain?

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS

Pain is so individual. It’s felt and processed differently by everyone. But what causes pain in the short and in the long term? Why does pain become chronic?


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Extra Cusion = MORE Impact?

As the trend in running shoes moves away from minimalism, many shoe companies have claimed that extra cushioning will reduce impact forces on the body, especially with downhill running. Intuitively, would seem to be true.


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Anatomy of a Runner

By Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt


When most people think about running, the first body part attributed to the movement are our legs. While our legs do the majority of the work, running is actually a full body exercise. Our legs move us forward, our trunk stabilizes our body, and our arms assist our legs with forward propulsion.


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Brain vs. Food

Fueling for exercise, especially during long runs, is a commonly discussed topic in the running world. Pre-race carb-loading, mid-race fuel sources, and post-race meals are all part of a typical routine. So why do we sometimes not feel hungry when finishing a run? And why are we starving other times? It turns out that following aerobic exercise our brain’s response to food can sometimes be reduced.

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Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

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Plyos for Performance

To be at peak performance and minimal injury risk, strength training should be an integral part of all running programs. For your strength training to be effective, you should should be specific and deliberate when choosing your exercises.

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IS MOBILITY BAD OR GOOD?

Hypermobility vs Flexibility? Is Mobility a Bad Thing?

What is hypermobility?

When talking about fitness, many people use flexibility and mobility interchangeably, but the two concepts are actually very different! Mobility refers to the range of motion in a joint. Mobility is influenced by both the joint structures (where one bone meets another) and the soft tissue that surrounds that joint. Flexibility refers only to the soft tissue itself.

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Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

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The Tired Foot?

Stress fractures are, unfortunately, a relatively common running injury. These injuries are the result of an unbalanced scale of activity at your bone; essentially stress (training) is occurring too fast for the body to rebuild the bone at an adequate rate. There are a number of factors that can contribute to a stress fracture: anatomy, training error, recovery errors, running mechanics, poor nutrition... the list goes on.

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Compartment Syndrome Update

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS)—can be a completely sidelining injury. It’s a condition most commonly seen in the lower leg among athletes, especially endurance runners. Symptoms typically develop as a tolerable pain, but as the runner continues running the pain worsens until it becomes unbearable and the runner has to stop.

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