ny-custom-pt-runners.png
Posts tagged running gear
Timing Your Iron

By Dr. Cathlin Fitzgerald, PT, DPT, CSCS


Iron deficiency is a common problem, is even more common among endurance athletes. Iron is lost through sweat, urine, the GI tract, and menstruation. Athletes need more iron than the average person; the more efficient the athlete, the more sweat is produced, and so more iron is lost. It has been shown that high intensity and endurance exercise can increase iron losses by 70%. Add in a vegan or vegetarian diet and the risk increases even more because the iron in plants is less absorbable.


Read More
What The Heck Is Pain?

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS

Pain is so individual. It’s felt and processed differently by everyone. But what causes pain in the short and in the long term? Why does pain become chronic?


Read More
Extra Cusion = MORE Impact?

As the trend in running shoes moves away from minimalism, many shoe companies have claimed that extra cushioning will reduce impact forces on the body, especially with downhill running. Intuitively, would seem to be true.


Read More
Anatomy of a Runner

By Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt


When most people think about running, the first body part attributed to the movement are our legs. While our legs do the majority of the work, running is actually a full body exercise. Our legs move us forward, our trunk stabilizes our body, and our arms assist our legs with forward propulsion.


Read More
HRV for Recovery Monitoring

More on HRV! How can I measure this myself? First, to recap: what is HRV? Your heart doesn't always beat at a constant frequency and there are small variations between beats. HRV is another term to describe variations in the intervals between heartbeats. Your rate of recovery is dependent on a number of variables, not just the intensity of your workout.

Read More
Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

Read More
Do I Really Need New Shoes?

We all have heard the recommendation to change shoes around 300-500 miles of use, but why? Where does this recommendation come from? When running, forces more than 2.5 times your body weight are applied up the leg and through the musculoskeletal system. Footwear has been designed to assist in absorbing these highmagnitude forces in order to improve performance and reduce injury risk. The cushioning in shoes can absorb shock and reduce how fast the force of landing acts on the body.

Read More