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Posts tagged running rehabilitation
Running While Sick

By Kathleen Leninger, DPT

When you’re training, experiencing sudden post-nasal drip, fever, headache, or any other initial signs of illness can really throw a wrench in your plans. You have a hard decision to make; to run or not to run?  

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Extra Cusion = MORE Impact?

As the trend in running shoes moves away from minimalism, many shoe companies have claimed that extra cushioning will reduce impact forces on the body, especially with downhill running. Intuitively, would seem to be true.


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Anatomy of a Runner

By Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt


When most people think about running, the first body part attributed to the movement are our legs. While our legs do the majority of the work, running is actually a full body exercise. Our legs move us forward, our trunk stabilizes our body, and our arms assist our legs with forward propulsion.


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Race Recovery

Recommendations for rest and recovery after a marathon vary widely across professionals and depend greatly on the individual marathoner. Then you can break it down even further; when is the cardiovascular system recovered? Muscles? Hormones? The list goes on and on!


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All Systems Go!

Running a marathon is not just about your muscles and your legs. As I reflected back on the process it dawned on me that it took every system on my body to complete the Marathon. So here it is, a review of all the systems it took to get to the finish line!

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Tips for Running in the Heat!

Tips for Running in the Heat!

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Activating the Glutes

You’ve just finished mile 26, the finish line is in sight, and you decide it’s time to start that finishing kick. Suddenly, you feel a sharp pain, immediately grab the back of your thigh, and stop running. Chances are, you’ve most likely pulled a hamstring. How? And what and can you do to avoid injuries like this in the future? It comes down to how your hamstrings and glutes work together.

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IT Bands. They’re lame. But totally fixable. {Guest Post!}

A little over two years ago I was running through the mountains of Virginia. Things were going well... until they weren’t. I would find out later from the esteemed, all-around amazing PT, Cat Fitzgerald, that years of running, cycling, and all manner of exercise (without the proper stretching or strength training) had finally caught up with me.

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Brain vs. Food

Fueling for exercise, especially during long runs, is a commonly discussed topic in the running world. Pre-race carb-loading, mid-race fuel sources, and post-race meals are all part of a typical routine. So why do we sometimes not feel hungry when finishing a run? And why are we starving other times? It turns out that following aerobic exercise our brain’s response to food can sometimes be reduced.

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Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

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Don't Skip Leg Day!

If you asked most runners what day they would skip in their training plan, I can guarantee most of them will answer “strength.” We often see runners whose training plans don't even have a strength day included! While running is extremely demanding on our legs, it involves primarily linear movement, or movement in a forward direction only. Runners typically have weaker glutes, hips, and hamstrings compared to the quads, which can result in numerous lower body injuries

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Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

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