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Posts tagged running shoes
Timing Your Iron

By Dr. Cathlin Fitzgerald, PT, DPT, CSCS


Iron deficiency is a common problem, is even more common among endurance athletes. Iron is lost through sweat, urine, the GI tract, and menstruation. Athletes need more iron than the average person; the more efficient the athlete, the more sweat is produced, and so more iron is lost. It has been shown that high intensity and endurance exercise can increase iron losses by 70%. Add in a vegan or vegetarian diet and the risk increases even more because the iron in plants is less absorbable.


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Running While Sick

By Kathleen Leninger, DPT

When you’re training, experiencing sudden post-nasal drip, fever, headache, or any other initial signs of illness can really throw a wrench in your plans. You have a hard decision to make; to run or not to run?  

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What The Heck Is Pain?

By Wendy Winn, PT, OCS

Pain is so individual. It’s felt and processed differently by everyone. But what causes pain in the short and in the long term? Why does pain become chronic?


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Extra Cusion = MORE Impact?

As the trend in running shoes moves away from minimalism, many shoe companies have claimed that extra cushioning will reduce impact forces on the body, especially with downhill running. Intuitively, would seem to be true.


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Anatomy of a Runner

By Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt


When most people think about running, the first body part attributed to the movement are our legs. While our legs do the majority of the work, running is actually a full body exercise. Our legs move us forward, our trunk stabilizes our body, and our arms assist our legs with forward propulsion.


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Run, Eat, Work, Sleep, Repeat

If this schedule sounds familiar, you’re most likely training for an upcoming race. Whether it’s a 10K or full marathon, your running schedule is probably dictating your life. Some weeks go smoothly and others can be a challenge. Between work, your social life, training, and getting enough food and sleep, how do we find the balance? Everyone maintains their life balance in different ways. If you’re anything like me, you rely on lists, meal prep, and a training schedule to guide you through each week. And while every week definitely hasn’t been perfect (I’m always learning), here’s how I’ve been balancing it all out.

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Injuries Suck - But They Don’t Have To!

Being injured sucks, there's no way around that. Injuries always seem to occur at the most inopportune times and throw a wrench in your perfectly designed training schedule. Every injury, no matter how big or small, sends a runner through the 5 stages of grief.

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Feel the (Foot) Burn

Strength exercises are important to a long distance runner, especially if you are trying to get faster. This is not a secret. When you name your target areas, you often think of the back, core, shoulders, chest, legs... but don’t forget your feet! It may seem silly at first but for runners, actual intrinsic foot strength is VERY important.

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Plyos for Performance

To be at peak performance and minimal injury risk, strength training should be an integral part of all running programs. For your strength training to be effective, you should should be specific and deliberate when choosing your exercises.

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IS MOBILITY BAD OR GOOD?

Hypermobility vs Flexibility? Is Mobility a Bad Thing?

What is hypermobility?

When talking about fitness, many people use flexibility and mobility interchangeably, but the two concepts are actually very different! Mobility refers to the range of motion in a joint. Mobility is influenced by both the joint structures (where one bone meets another) and the soft tissue that surrounds that joint. Flexibility refers only to the soft tissue itself.

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Too Much Bounce in your Run?

The relationship between running injuries and the amount of vertical force (up and down movement and impact) during running has been well-documented through many recent studies. “Vertical ground reaction force” (VGRF) is the force that the ground exerts up through a runner’s leg when landing. The rate at which these forces are applied to the body is called “vertical impact loading rate” (VILR). So if the vertical ground reaction forces are applied too quickly and not absorbed well, injury risk can be increased significantly.

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Do I Really Need New Shoes?

We all have heard the recommendation to change shoes around 300-500 miles of use, but why? Where does this recommendation come from? When running, forces more than 2.5 times your body weight are applied up the leg and through the musculoskeletal system. Footwear has been designed to assist in absorbing these highmagnitude forces in order to improve performance and reduce injury risk. The cushioning in shoes can absorb shock and reduce how fast the force of landing acts on the body.

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