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Posts tagged strength for runners
Anatomy of a Runner

By Dr. Lisbeth Hoyt


When most people think about running, the first body part attributed to the movement are our legs. While our legs do the majority of the work, running is actually a full body exercise. Our legs move us forward, our trunk stabilizes our body, and our arms assist our legs with forward propulsion.


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Why You Should Strength Train in the Off-Season

As fall race season comes to a close and 2019 is on the horizon, it’s time to think about the off-season planning.  As you begin to lay out your 2019 race calendar, take note of when your next training plan starts and the downtime you may have from the last race. Like many runners, the second one race ends, we’re thinking about the next one. But what about strength training? Where does that fit in to your 2019 plan?

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Strength Training for Bones!

Weight training affects more than just muscles; it can also strengthen your bones! As we age, bones begin to lose mineral density (Bone Mineral Density - BMD), and they becoming slightly weaker as a result; this is particularly evident in postmenopausal women. This condition is commonly known as osteoporosis. This decrease in BMD can be of concern, as weaker bones are at an increased risk of bone fracture. Longitudinal studies have shown that appropriatelyprescribed progressive resistance training can stimulate bone growth and increasing BMD in older adults, reducing risk of fracture.

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Don't Skip Leg Day!

If you asked most runners what day they would skip in their training plan, I can guarantee most of them will answer “strength.” We often see runners whose training plans don't even have a strength day included! While running is extremely demanding on our legs, it involves primarily linear movement, or movement in a forward direction only. Runners typically have weaker glutes, hips, and hamstrings compared to the quads, which can result in numerous lower body injuries

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RECOVERY AFTER A HIIT WORKOUT

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a widely-accepted as a measure for recovery after workouts. As runners are always looking to work harder (read: get faster) and avoid injury, research continues to expand. When considering how to improve performance, training sessions are almost always the first thought. HRV came into play once we started considering how well athletes were recovering after their workouts.

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