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Posts in triathlon nyc
"Run The World" Takeaways

Sometimes I want to read about running, but not about how I should be running, or what I should change about my running. If you’re feeling the same, “Run the World” is for you!

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Activating the Glutes

You’ve just finished mile 26, the finish line is in sight, and you decide it’s time to start that finishing kick. Suddenly, you feel a sharp pain, immediately grab the back of your thigh, and stop running. Chances are, you’ve most likely pulled a hamstring. How? And what and can you do to avoid injuries like this in the future? It comes down to how your hamstrings and glutes work together.

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Baby Got Back?

Baby got back? While this song may remind you of the 90’s, for runners a weak booty may be contributing to some common running injuries. Your butt muscles, also known as the gluteus maximus, medium, and minimus, keep the pelvis steady, propel us forward, and extend the hips during walking and running. In addition to being aesthetically pleasing in yoga pants, a functionally strong gluteal group decreases the risk of injury when running.

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All Systems GO!

In February, it became official: I was running the TCS NYC Marathon! As a physical therapist working in a running-based clinic I figured I had a pretty good idea of what to expect from the training. The miles, time commitment, nutrition; I was ready for it all, right? I quickly found out that it was much more work than I expected.

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WTF is the TFL?

If you've ever had a hip or knee injury as a runner, you most likely have heard of the TFL. But what exactly is it and what role does it play in daily movement? The TFL (tensor fascia latae) is a muscle responsible for flexing, abducting (bringing out to the side), and internally rotating your hip. The TFL originates at the top of your pelvis and narrows into an attachment to your iliotibial band. Tightness in this muscle pulls the ball of your hip too far forward in the socket and makes it difficult for your hip to maintain its neutral position when walking and running.

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Marathons Make Me Sick!

Congratulations! You ran the marathon! Once you’ve worn your medal to work and the celebrations have died down, it’s time to assess what went well, what didn’t, and how to make it better or the next training cycle.

As you’re recovering from the marathon, don’t neglect to rebuild your immune system. Take this time to get your body back to 100% before you get back out there. A recent study looked at the effects of marathon training on neutrophils and your immune system. Neutrophils areresponsible for attacking the surface of bacteria in the body.

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Post-marathon Blues??

Post Marathon Blues? Completely Normal! Let us help you work through it.

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What are your goals?
Why Fresh Legs!??!?!

On November 1, 2015, several sweaty, joyful, exhausted runners trickled through our doors after crossing the finish line of the TCS NYC Marathon. Sore and victorious, they told their heroic tales of their mornings that had begun before sunrise on Staten Island and involved self-transformation through the boroughs of New York City, all the way to the finish in Central Park. 

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Jump on the Hydration Train!

Here is a story that we are hearing weekly these days.

Patient: I ran over the weekend and I didn’t realize it was so humid.  My run went really well but my achilles tendon has been on fire ever since.

Therapist:  How much water did you drink this weekend

Patient: 2 cups of coffee and 1 bottle of beer

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Age and Achilles

Most runners are acutely aware of all of the different types of injuries that can occur. I f they aren't , it's typically because they've been lucky enough to remain injury - free. But as we age, t he possibility of injury continues to increase.

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Gutsy Performance

“Should I go before the warm up or after…or maybe before and after?”  If you have ever run a road race, you know one of the most daunting tasks on race day is standing in line for the porta-potty.  It’s in every runner’s pre-race routine though because running on an upset stomach is no fun!  Sometimes despite your best effort however, the stomach bug will find you during an intense workout or race.  An email questionnaire was sent to over 2,000 runners following a marathon event in the Netherlands.  Of the 1,281 runners who responded, 45% complained of at least one GI symptom during the event. Why is that?

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